Forecasting Tutorial: Air Masses

15 May 2014 2

Forecasting Tutorials is a series of in-depth articles where we teach you the techniques of surf and marine forecasting.

Meteorology Basics: Pressure systems

By Marine Forecaster Katie Jackson

Our main concern in this article has to do with the relationship of a pressure system to its surroundings. Air pressure can be measured (atm, hectopascal, millibar) but the relative difference between pressure systems is what counts for weather and wind behaviour. In forecasting, it is best to focus on the interplay between pressure systems. It is the way pressure systems interact that matters.

Gaining an understanding of the interaction of pressure systems can bring you one step closer to conditions like this. Photo: Judy Scanlon.

Gaining an understanding of the interaction of pressure systems can bring you one step closer to conditions like this. Photo: Judy Scanlon.

Air Masses

Basic weather charts used in forecasts are barometric. They outline air masses by differentiating areas of surface pressure. At the surface, pressure is the measured force the air mass above us exerts down. Each area of equal atmospheric pressure on a chart has an isobar, which outlines the pressure gradient and encircles areas of high and low pressures. So what do isobars have to do with waves? Isobars paint a picture of the wind forcing that effects wave generation. Difference in pressure leads air to move as winds and this ultimately leads to waves when it occurs over the ocean.

High pressure/Low pressure
There isn't a particular number that distinguishes a high pressure from a low pressure. As well, there is not a set temperature range associated with either one. A high-pressure system occurs where air mass is denser than in surrounding areas, and therefore exerts a higher force or pressure. The opposite is true for low pressure. If the air mass above the Earth is less dense than in surrounding areas, less force or pressure exerted, and therefore an area of relatively low pressure occurs.

  • High Pressure = air condensing sinking to surface
  • Low Pressure = air expansion rising up to atmosphere.

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2013/01/31/3679358.htm. If the air is entering an area of low pressure at the surface, winds curve inward and move up, known at convergence. If air is exiting an area of high pressure, winds are forcing down and curve out, known as divergence.

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2013/01/31/3679358.htm. If the air is entering an area of low pressure at the surface, winds curve inward and move up, known at convergence. If air is exiting an area of high pressure, winds are forcing down and curve out, known as divergence.

If the air is entering an area of low pressure at the surface, winds curve inward and move up, known at convergence. If air is exiting an area of high pressure, winds are forcing down and curve out, known as divergence. Not only are horizontal changes in wind occurring during convergence and divergence but vertical changes as well. The movement of air vertically in the atmosphere is a strong indication of atmospheric stability and great changes in pressure, temperature, and winds differ at each layer. Atmospheric charts are made at varying heights in the atmosphere to distinguish these changes in vertical profiles of air masses. 

Pressure gradient
The pressure gradient force is the main force acting on air to make it move. When air moves it manifests as wind. The pressure gradient is simply the change of air pressure over distance and relates directly to wind speed. For ocean winds, the pressure gradient at mean sea level is the most important driving factor for wave generation.

Pressure gradient = pressure difference / distance

If a large change in atmospheric pressure occurs over a small distance, a strong pressure gradient occurs. This leads to significant force on air to move from high to low pressure and results in high wind speeds. Large pressure changes in close proximity can be referred to have a “tight” pressure gradient due to closely places isobars shown on a MSLP chart. The opposite will occur if a pressure gradient is “loose” with less change experienced between pressure systems or the pressure systems are far apart. 

MSLP Image: BOM. Generally, winds travel along the direction of isobars on a barometric chart and the closer the isobars are together, the higher the wind speeds and higher wave generation.

MSLP Image: BOM. Generally, winds travel along the direction of isobars on a barometric chart and the closer the isobars are together, the higher the wind speeds and higher wave generation.

Wind Behaviour
Air flows clockwise around low-pressure systems and anticlockwise around high-pressure systems in the southern hemisphere (opposite in the northern hemisphere). This directional change in wind occurs due to the rotation of the Earth around its axis, known at the Coriolis effect. Initial air movement begins with the pressure gradient, but the Coriolis effect may change wind direction once in motion. This secondary force is dependent on location, with strongest effect at the poles and zero at the equator.

Last mentioned but certainly not least are frictional forces. Frictional force will result in the decay of wind speeds or change in direction due to shearing effect. For surface winds over the ocean, frictional drag is considered low compared to surface winds over land. It is the friction that occurs over the ocean surface that is responsible for wave formation. Moving air mass transfers energy from the atmosphere to the sea through winds and the friction helps to form waves. It all begins with changes in atmospheric pressure that bring us to the point of initial swell development.

Forces acting on an air mass to produce the resultant wind. image: http://www.aviationweather.ws/.

Forces acting on an air mass to produce the resultant wind. image: http://www.aviationweather.ws/.


Tags: meteorology , pressure systems , weather maps , synoptic charts , topnews (create Alert from these tags)

blog comments powered by Disqus
More From Forecasting Tutorials
Forecasting Tutorial: Reading Wave Models

Forecasting Tutorial: Reading Wave Models

Gain a deeper understanding into how wave models work and how to read them.

0 16 May 2014
Surf Forecast Glossary

Surf Forecast Glossary

Keep up to date with the Forecasting lingo.

0 16 May 2014
Recent
All The Best Malarkey Happening On Sunday Surfday at Byron Bay Surf Festival

All The Best Malarkey Happening On Sunday Surfday at Byron Bay Surf Festival

4 14 Feb 2018
Home Grown Keeps It Classic

Home Grown Keeps It Classic

0 10 Feb 2018
Video: My Home Break With Matt Wilkinson

Video: My Home Break With Matt Wilkinson

3 8 Feb 2018
Nichols And Baker Rule The Roost At The Mothernest Tweed Coast Pro

Nichols And Baker Rule The Roost At The Mothernest Tweed Coast Pro

0 7 Feb 2018
Latest News

All The Best Malarkey Happening On Sunday Surfday at Byron Bay Surf Festival

Mark Your Calendars andGrab Your Boardies For The Last Sunday In Feb

Home Grown Keeps It Classic

Billabong’s New Boardshorts Release

Video: My Home Break With Matt Wilkinson

Wilko talks about moving to the North Coast of NSW

Nichols And Baker Rule The Roost At The Mothernest Tweed Coast Pro

Upsets & Upstarts At Event Two Of The NSW Pro Surf Series

Popular This Week

Standout Sessions: The Lunch Session At Kirra On Sunday

Drainpipes For Days At The Kirra Surfriders Club Contest!

Video: The Dawn Session At Kirra Sunday Morning

Fast, Chunky Tubes For Cooly's Early Risers

Video: Rainbow Through Greenmount On Saturday Morning

Coupl'a Waves, More Than A Coupl'a People

Weekend Surf Forecast 16 - 18 February 2018

Are you ready for some late summer aquatic madness?

Tom Curren Goes Roller Skating With Occy, Indo on a 5'4" Twin Fin, and Wade Goodall's Floater-To-Chop Hop

This Week In Surfing: Ten Things From Surfing & The Internet On The Week That Was February 16, 2018

Go to Top